Plenaries

Plenaries

Plenary Talks including Debates and Round Tables

Plenary 1: Effects of Static and Oscillatory Magnetic Fields on Cryptochromes: A Mechanistic Perspective


Content

Despite studies on the interaction of magnetic fields with the cryptochrome receptor have been around for years, interesting new findings, published in excellent scientific journals, became available recently. Basically, these studies give increasing evidence or an interaction including mechanistic data. Apart from in vivo studies, theoretical approaches have been published. Therefore, this plenary will include a presentation on biological effects and underlying mechanisms as well as theoretical hypotheses on the underlying mechanisms with interaction between the two.


Speakers/Titles

Rachel Muheim, Lund University, Sweden
“Cryptochrome-based magnetoreception and the effects of RF-fields on animal orientation”

Daniel Kattnig, University of Exeter, UK
“Effects of static and oscillatory magnetic fields on cryptochromes: a mechanistic perspective”

 

Plenary 2: The International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Draft High Frequency (100 kHz – 300 GHz) Guidelines


Content

ICNIRP is revising the guidelines for high-frequency (100 kHz – 300 GHz) published in 1998 since 2014. At the BioEM meeting the draft of the guidelines will be presented and disseminated for subsequent public consultation in order to engage feedback from the scientific community. This will ensure that relevant literature is not missed and that all perspectives are appropriately considered.


Speaker

Rodney J. Croft, University of Wollongong, Australia

 

Plenary 3: Exploring Dielectrophoresis and its Applications in the Biomedical Sciences


Content

Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been widely studied for its potential as a biomarker-free method of sorting cells and other bioparticles based on their intrinsic dielectric properties. Under appropriate experimental conditions the DEP frequency spectrum typically exhibited by a viable mammalian cell in suspension is characterized by two frequencies, fxo1 and fxo2. At low frequencies (<10 kHz) viable cells typically exhibit negative DEP. Understanding and biomedical exploitation of this phenomenon can be considered to represent exploration of the ‘1st frontier of cellular dielectrophoresis’. The factors that control the high frequency DEP cross-over at fxo2 have only recently been explored, and the status and implications of this ‘2nd frontier of dielectrophoresis’ will be discussed.


Speaker

Ronald Pethig, The University of Edinburgh, UK

 

Plenary 4: Frontiers of Electroporation, from Mechanisms to Applications


Content

Electroporation is a well assessed topic and at the same time a continuously evolving field, great efforts are put in an always better understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the cellular response, at the same time an exciting exploitation of possible new applications is growing. Aim of this plenary is to give a new, informative and exciting view of this scientific evolution perspective. In particular a focus on new methodology based on classical-quantum modelling to study possible lipid peroxidation due to electric fields. Beside this a new possible application is described based on neuronal stimulation with nanosecond electric pulses.


Speakers/Titles

Andrei Pakhomov, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, U.S.
“Advances in electroporation and activation of cells by nanosecond stimuli”

Mounir Tarek, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France
“Unraveling new key molecular level aspects using computational chemistry”